Wednesday, August 6, 2014

'Tis A Gift To Be Simple.....And When It Is Not.

It never fails.  New clients walk into my office and sit down for our first meeting of the estate planning process.  Once the initial hellos are finished and the legal services agreement reviewed and signed, we get down to business.  Nine times out of ten I hear "oh, this will be simple, we are a solid middle class family." Instantly this Shaker song pops into my mind (one I adore and delight in signing at our UU church).


The song makes me smile, such a happy little ditty.  The client(s) is smiling, thinking this will be simple because they do not have tons of assets, just the normal amount of a normal person or couple here in the heart of the Midwest.

A glance at their questionnaire and the tune fades from my mind, replaced by something for chaotic. Something more ominous.  Something that is anything but simple. Something along these lines:


Why the change in background music?  It's simple really.  Money is not what makes estate planning complex, life circumstances make it simple or complex.

Me: I see it is a second marriage for both of you, and that there are three children from one side and two from the other.  Correct?

Client: Why yes, is that a problem?

Me: Not a problem, but certainly not simple.

Or

Me: You've been together for 18 years, never married, she has a son from a prior marriage.  Correct?

Client: Yes, is that a problem?

Me: Not a problem, but we have some issues to explore.

These are what estate planners call Blended Families, and they are not as easy to plan for as the squares in the Brady Bunch boxes might make it appear.  They are complex situations.  What happens when the first spouse dies?  It passes to the survivor, but then where?  Locking in plan to the kids requires a trust most likely, and with that, simple burst like a balloon on a 98 degree day.


Sadly, single with no children does not guarantee simplicity either.

Me: Your questionnaire indicates that you wish to leave your entire estate to eight nieces and nephews for their college education.  And you want to make sure expenses for your three poodles are paid for after your death.  Correct?

Client: Yes, is that hard to do?

Me: Not necessarily hard, but a simple will cannot accomplish these goals.  You'll need a will with trusts -- plural, one for the college funds and one for the dogs.

Who is simple might you wonder?

Me: I see that you are married with two adult children.  There is a combined net work of $3.7 million.  You want everything to go to the surviving spouse, and upon his/her death, equally to the children.  Correct?

Client: Yes, does the net worth create problems?

Me: No, you are under the federal estate tax and it appears that a simple will might be all you need.

Life -- it is always throwing us for a loop.

1 comment:

Bilal Hassan said...

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